Looking for Unconditional Love?

Compassionate Love:Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness  (c)2014 Nancy Virden

close up of a beautiful young woman looking upwardsWe are talented. We can pinpoint a god in any situation. We think a few drinks will calm our nerves, or bingeing and purging will prevent rejection, or a significant person will confirm our value.

Unconditional love is our deepest desire and we will either find it or something else that will shield us from the pain of not finding it. 

Substitutes for unconditional love can only mask our emotions; we are not truly bypassing our need. Relief from anything short of unconditional love is temporary.

Our search deepens as we discover our choices have caused more pain.  Addictions, bad habits, and self-neglect have ruined our physical health. Poor communication, nasty attitudes, and isolation have kept us alone and lonely. Excuses hold us back.

We have wandered the earth, so to speak, and managed only to get lost. We no longer remember a resting place.

What often is left unexpressed is universal disappointment in the search for unconditional love. Platitudes, and leads to more false hope are perhaps coming from those who are trying to convince themselves. For some, manipulating and controlling us is their distraction and escape.

At risk of losing followers of this blog, I’m going to propose a radical option:

Ask the real God.

Twelve Step recovery groups often call him “higher power.” I call him Jesus. In him I find no religion, lies, or broken promises. He is my shepherd and I have all the unconditional love I’ve dreamed about at my fingertips. By learning to grasp what he offers, I am dropping all my other gods and finding peace.

 ***********

NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline   1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help can be yours.

*picture from kozzi.com

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