Moods are Moody

Compassionate Love: Displaying Compassion for Those Who Struggle with Mental Illness or Abuse  (c)2019 Nancy Virden, Always The Fight Ministries

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How many mood shifts do you observe in the following story?

You wake sensing all is well. With a stretch you begin singing the theme song of Snow White’s seven friends. “Hi ho, hi ho, it’s off to work we go…”

Today the new boss will arrive.  Assured you left early enough to make a good first impression, you calmly turn to the freeway’s entrance ramp only to suddenly slam the brakes! Traffic is at a standstill. With no escape, your mood sinks into frustration.

Your co-workers are exiting the morning meeting when you arrive. The new executive thanks each by name and gives you a quizzical look. Grateful at the chance to introduce yourself and explain your lateness, you step towards her, extending your hand.

Someone calls her name and she walks away. You begin to question your choice to get out of bed.

Hours later, your best suit is too hot. You felt successful this morning,  but by midday your mood is as soggy as your clothes. You have not yet met the new boss, and there is a paper jam.

Having maintained a professional demeanor and accomplished a significant amount of work despite the all-day battle against increasingly strong emotions, cleaning out the printer tips the scale. With a deep sigh, you mutter, “I hate this job!”

From behind a voice says, “You do not have to stay.”

Turning to see the same quizzical look on the boss’s face as this morning, your apologies begin.

So, how many mood changes do you see?

From content, eager, and happy feelings to frustration, disappointment, and anger, fear and hope end the workday. Keep in mind all the “little” emotions in-between such as the pride of a job well done, hurt over a co-worker’s comment, relief when the catered lunch is your favorite, and much more.

Moods had a moody day!

Good news is that moods are fluid. They change all the time. That means even the most difficult emotions will pass.

Whether you’ve held them in or worn them on your sleeve, moods are not constant. Give them time (and perhaps a good night’s sleep) before making decisions based on moody moods. Use your wise mind and accept that feelings come and go.

Today’s Helpful Word  

Proverbs 5:6,7

Trust in the Lord with all your heart,
And lean not on your own understanding;
 In all your ways acknowledge Him,
And He will direct your paths

**** COMMENTS ALWAYS WELCOME

NOTE:  I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental and behavioral health challenges.  In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental or behavioral health care.

If you are feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, in the U.S. call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or for a list of international suicide hotlines, go here.

If you are suicidal with a plan, immediately call 911 in the U.S. or go to your nearest emergency room. (for international emergency numbers, go here ). Hope and help are yours!

 

 

 

 

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