Tag Archives: psychiatrist

For One of the Least of These: Helping The Stranger

Compassionate Love Blog: Displaying compassion for those who fight mental illness, addiction, and abuse  (c)2018  Nancy Virden, Always the Fight Ministries

woman in black long sleeved shirt
Photo by Designecologist on Pexels.com

Dehumanizing a person in our thoughts or speech makes it easier to fear and hate. Dehumanizing a people group works the same way. Equating a race or gender with animals is one way in which society has dehumanized people. Another form of such dehumanization occurs when struggles with mental health are demonized or wrapped up in one word- crazy. 

Fear of people with histories of mental illness is reaching new extremes. Reporting on the very few violent types carelessly connects mental illness with murder. Truth is, the vast majority of people with mental illness are more likely to be victims of violence. Those who have attempted suicide are not going to “go off” and attack others. 

We need to better understand what brings a person to the point they are homicidal. Mental illness may be a factor, but is not a predictor. 

For example, a recent mass shooter was reported to have seen a psychiatrist. I believe the article said he had visited this doctor one time. The story implied that because he had seen a psychiatrist he must be crazy, and therefore ended up killing people. Here is another way of looking at it. He saw a psychiatrist only once, and did not follow through with treatment, hence did not accept the help offered to him. 

By equating “he saw a psychiatrist” with murderous behavior, stigma is encouraged. People who will benefit from psychiatric care may feel shamed into not going. 

Beyond mass shooters and other criminals are millions of people who for one reason or another struggle with mental illness to varying degrees. Instead of being knowledgeable and learning to practice healthy boundaries, we run away or ignore them.

We have each been a stranger. For whatever reason, we have each been judged. It has never benefited us to feel misunderstood. In this way, we can relate to those who are ostracized because of their mental health history. 

Here is today’s invitation. If you know someone with a past of mental illness, say hello.  This website offers information on how to be supportive. Simple internet searches will lead you to such information as well.

Be wise. I am not suggesting we ignore one’s history of violent behavior and invite them to hang out with our families. I am simply inviting you to avoid dehumanizing someone based on a history of mental illness. Let’s drop the negative assumptions and fear. Let’s drop the hate and “lock ’em all up” attitude which is growing in the U.S.

Today’s Helpful Word

Matthew 25: 37

Then the righteous will answer him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink?  And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’  And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers (and sisters), you did it to me.’

 

***** COMMENTS ALWAYS WELCOME

NOTE:  I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental and behavioral health challenges.  In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental or behavioral health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, in the U.S. call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or for a list of international suicide hotlines, go here.

If you are suicidal with a plan, immediately call 911 in the U.S.  (for international emergency numbers, go here ), or go to your nearest emergency room. Do not be alone. Hope and help are yours.

 

5 Most Common Responses When I Tell People My History Includes Attempted Suicide

Compassionate Love: Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness   (c)2017 Nancy Virden, Always The Fight Ministries  

Whenever I tell my story of recovery after attempted suicide, I have learned to expect one or more of the following responses.

photo-24768393-old-man-raising-his-eye-brow1. “My (insert loved one- son, mother, friend, etc.) killed himself (or herself).” 

Often, the speaker leans away or makes some movement indicating discomfort and distrust. Once he or she realizes I am interested and not judgmental, the torrent starts.

I learn about the day their loved one died, what warning signs were left before the suicide, and memories of the victim. Always, the suicide was unexpected. Without fail, the survivor suffers guilt.

Many of these suicides were in the far past. Decades and even generations later, suicide continues to hurt those left behind.  

2. “I have been there.”

I hear this at every official event and in most casual gatherings where my story is shared whether the topic was advertised ahead of time or not. The sheer number of people who have experienced such severe depression and hopelessness is staggering.

3. “How can I help my friend (or family member) who  is depressed?”

With worried faces and often desperation in their voices, people want to know how to “fix” others who struggle with depression. Sometimes the plea for normalcy is an angry one. They are disappointed that life has become so hard because a loved one is dysfunctional.

Usually, when I reply that none of us can fix anyone else and the best support is non-judgmental, people remain upset or worried and leave with a difficult understanding. Others hear hope and immediately embrace learning more practical ideas. 

4. “No one understands.”

A psychologist attended a conference with others in his field. Their overwhelming consensus was that the number one hardship for patients is a lack of effective support at home.

Generally, in American society we are clueless how to handle one another’s suffering. The reason is fear based in lack of know-how. Mental illness is especially challenging to understand because we have been and continue to be falsely indoctrinated that people who live with it are scary and possibly violent.

Normalizing mental health issues is an important part of saving lives and treating those who live with mental illness.

5. “I help those who live with mental illness.”

Volunteers, religious leaders, school principals and teachers, professional counselors and therapists, nurses and doctors of nearly every specialty, and others want me to know they are in the fight too. Sometimes they have questions.

Interestingly, psychologists and psychiatrists whom I’ve never met before, want to know what type of therapy I receive, medicines I take, and how I feel now. It is slightly amusing when they assume an automatic right to examine my recovery. It is also nice to see that these caretakers are passionate about their profession. I openly and freely answer most inquiries because if I can help by sharing what works, that is what I want to do.

A stigma surrounding suicide is that those left behind ought somehow be ashamed. Even the topic is taboo. People express gratitude when I listen without advising or overreacting because so often they are not heard.

neqg3zyToday’s Helpful Word

Psalm 10:17

You [God] listen to the longings of those who suffer.
You offer them hope, and you pay attention
    to their cries for help.

 

 **********COMMENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.

NOTE:  I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help is yours.

How to Know When It’s Time for Professional Help: Part 1, First Clues

CompassionateLove Blog: Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness  (c)2017  Nancy Virden, Always the Fight Ministry

“Depressed  in bed  over a year” is a Google search that landed someone on my post,   “My Depressed Loved One Won’t Get out of Bed. What Am I to Say?”  From the outside, it may seem obvious that someone in bed for over a year needs professional help. In the middle of the situation however, confusion can be blinding.

Our thinking processes are thrown into a blender sometimes when we face a mental health crisis. Stigma, myths, uncertainty, mixed messages, and our own lack of knowledge has us in a spin. We may know we need and even deserve to feel better, yet question if seeking help is a weakness or too expensive.

Confronted with Depression, either our own or a loved one’s, we do not always understand the symptoms. When is it time to stop fighting this without professional help?

There are clues. A brief series on this blog will try to cover most. Keep in mind, not every person will show the same symptoms or intensity of symptoms. These clues are meant as guides, not diagnostic tools. 

First Clues – Disrupted Function

Everyone gets the blues. We experience grief. Sometimes we burn-out or stress takes us to our bed for a few days.  Generally, we are functioning again within a few days. Emotional pain may continue, yet we go to work, carry on relationships, and grow stronger over time.

When our functioning is significantly impaired, we need help. Depression may have us staring off into space, barely capable of moving. We might call off work, cut off social interactions, or become irritable or withdrawn. Our job suffers, relationships suffer, and instead of feeling better, we are on a downward spiral in our minds.

At this point we may hear family members and friends expressing concern or anger. We probably wish we could do better and be a better person. We question our value. Our physical health may suffer as we eat or sleep too much or not enough.

We may feel trapped by circumstances or by this mental enemy. We  think, Today I am going to get this under control. I just have to focus. By noon we are spent. Efforts at pretending this mood is not all that bad are failing.

Blame can go anywhere – to our parents, our boss, brain chemicals, the devil, or on ourselves. It does not matter, because blame does not cure anything. Reaching out for support is difficult because we are likely in a mixed state of denial, pain, a sense of worthlessness, and confusion.

Yet that is what we need. By telling someone who knows how to react, we find out our options. Pastors,  counselors, good friends, and other confidants are often helpful. Some have more insight than others. Professional and licensed therapists are better trained. Psychiatrists are medical doctors who will focus on medication. Remember, you are dealing with an extreme emotional reaction that is neither your fault or easily controlled. 

It does not hurt to ask for help.


opisimuToday’s Helpful Word

Proverbs 11: 2

“…with humility comes wisdom.   

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COMMENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME (see tab below)

NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help is yours.

 

Four Stigmatized Words that Freak People Out: Word 4

Compassionate Love: Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness   (c)2014 Nancy Virden

photo-24736910-close-up-of-tables-spilling-out-of-a-bottle_Fear of this word drives people to silence (a trend with these words that freak people out!).

People who do not want to discuss this word might be the belligerent types. “I don’t need a _________! I’m not going to get sucked into that baloney.”

Perhaps the one who will not consider this word is misinformed. “_________ just shove drugs at you.”

Or maybe the word is a joke.  “I’m not going to have my head shrunk.”

Psychiatrist. An unfortunate stigma related to the word psychiatrist, is a belief that when it is ‘only’ our thinking or emotions which trouble us, there is no need for a medical diagnosis or treatment. Even if we are open to psychiatric medications, we may not see the need for a specialist.  “I’ll just go to my General Practitioner. He/she knows me. They can prescribe something.”

Most GPs these days will send a patient with a skin condition to a dermatologist. If someone walks into an internist’s office with signs of heart issues, that internist will refer the case to a cardiologist. Why then, do we freak out over the word psychiatrist? They are brain science specialists.

One broad misunderstanding is that a psychiatrist is a therapist.  Psychiatrists are medical doctors who are generally untrained or unpracticed in therapy techniques. Does it seem that “all” they do is “shove” medications at patients? Perhaps that negative viewpoint comes from the false premise that psychiatrists are supposed to cover the entire spectrum of mental health care.

Visits to a psychiatrist are commonly 15-30 minutes long. All that occurs in that time is a brief discussion of how the patient is feeling followed by a suggested treatment plan. My psychiatrist checks if my medications and dosages are working, reminds me to talk to my therapist, and writes out prescriptions. 

Of course she does. She’s a Medical Doctor, an  M.D., a specialist in the medicinal treatment of mental illness. 

She’s not scary at all.

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NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help can be yours.

*picture from qualitystockphotos

 

Some Dos and Don’ts for Supporting Your Loved One with Depression

Compassionate Love: Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness   (c)2014 Nancy Virden

photo-24768393-old-man-raising-his-eye-browA husband is having a depressive episode and it may be major. He feels spiritually dead, and lack of motivation and energy pin him to the couch. It’s likely that emotional pain is a hundred times worse than any physical suffering he has experienced.

It is extremely important your loved one be seen by a medical doctor of mental health- a psychiatrist – to ascertain what is wrong and offer appropriate treatment. Talk therapy and medication combined may be what helps best.

Effectively supporting your loved one who is living with depression, does not have to be complicated.  Here are some suggestions based on personal (not professional) experience with major depression.

Begin by gently asking what he needs in the moment. He may not know, however believe what he says.

Do not try to “fix” him. You may not intend to harass him, but repeatedly demanding he go for a walk or help around the house is not helpful. Try instead, “I’m going for a walk and I’d like you to come with me if you want to” or “Can you dry the dishes while I wash them? I’d like to have your company.” This type of approach is accepting.

If there is anything (non-patronizing) that you can do or say to let him know he is valuable, do or say it. Avoid guilt trips. Hearing you are wanted and needed is different from being told you are failing.

Anything he can do to help himself is good. Even climbing out of bed for a few minutes counts. Help him see he is making progress, that you enjoyed the few minutes he was up, and that it matters.

More than anything else you can offer, just be there. That’s huge. In his depression he may not think anyone cares about him. You say you do, but maybe he believes you are mistaken. Also, he may fear you will not care much longer because he is unproductive and “useless”.

If you can just be there, completely accepting him for who is in the moment  (sitting beside his bed reading a book silently, making his favorite meal, chattering with small talk even if he’s quiet), these ordinary little things can mean more than you know.

I highly recommend the book (also in audio), “When You Can’t Snap Out of It: Finding Your Way Through Depression” by Dr. Louis Bevilacqua. Many of Dr. Bevilacqua’s simple exercises have been and continue to be useful for me.  If possible, do them together.  Don’t carry high expectations for fast relief. Depression is often difficult to overcome.

Do something nice for yourself. Keep talking to friends or professionals about what you are going through, because if you do not have your own support you will suffer too.

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NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help can be yours.

*picture from qualitystockphotos

Where is Good Counsel to be Found? Story 6

Compassionate Love:Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness  (c)2014 Nancy Virden

nr7rjpiI titled this Story 6 because it is doubtless not the last. There will be more to say on this topic in the future, however I expect it to be positive. Why? Because great mental health care is available and can be found.

We are all “abnormal” in the sense no one is like another; our needs are unique. In the earlier parts of this series my point is we can avoid pitfalls in searching for professional mental health care that is right for us.

For example, I may struggle with vulnerability if a therapist is very disorganized. It affects my trust level. How about you? What characteristics in a therapist might have detrimental or positive influences on your healing?

It’s an understatement to say I was not in my strongest emotional condition as I looked for help. I had waited until desperation set in before reaching out. While it is ideal to hire a therapist when healthy, it is not common. Professionals know this about clients, and are responsible to act accordingly. If one does not, keep moving.

This is where a friend or family member can get involved and be effective. Tell them what kind of person you hope to find. Your support can make calls, search out the information referred to in this series, and lead you to your first meeting.

One of my initial criteria was that I wanted to see this person twice a week. Unfortunately I had to settle for once per week which was difficult for me at the time. Compromises are ok if you can live with them.

Gentleness is most important to me. Yell, and I will likely not trust you again.  Affirmations like, “Proud of you” and “You’ve come a long way” stir my confidence. What do you need?

My son asked me recently, “Don’t you get tired of working on yourself?”

That made me laugh and still does. Fact is, I do grow tired of working on myself, extremely tired,  and want to give up often. However, these people are teaching me how to live in the present. I’m learning why I want to stay alive and how to experience that abundant life Jesus talked about.

The success of a therapist is a client who leaves their care able to carry on in a healthy manner. Maybe you will not need so many years to reach this goal, or perhaps you will need more time. Remember, all that is required for forward movement is one step at a time. Slow progress is progress.

Maybe you or someone in your life believes psychology and therapy are for weak losers. Here is the good news I promised in the last of this series. Since completely giving up on life…

  • I have had two books published with a third going to the publisher this week.
  • I am traveling and sharing my story of recovery with young adults who have largely been marginalized by society.
  • Opportunity to teach at church and in seminars has come my way seven times so far.
  • There is a small group of women who consider me a support and friend.
  • I’m more honest, working on being both honest and gentle simultaneously, and learning how to be a true friend.
  • I’ve forgiven persons who caused me harm, and am creating distance between me and those who would continue to do so.
  • I’m slowly learning I count.

Is this weakness? Your opinion is up to you. I see it as the fight of my life, and that is saying a lot. The bravest thing I have ever done is stay alive when I wanted to be dead.

I do this for God, for my sons, and hope one day to do this for me. That is why I still get help, and am so grateful to have found it even though it took so long.

You don’t have to have my experiences. Pay attention to the guidance in this series. It will lead you to good counsel that fits you just right.

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NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline   1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help can be yours.

 

Where is Good Counsel to be Found? Story 4

Compassionate Love:Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness   (c)2014 Nancy Virden

photo-24743417-two-people-shaking-handsIf you are following this series, you may be thinking you could never handle what happened to me. However, everything happens for a reason.

It was exasperating at the time, yes. Now I have opportunity to show countless people how to avoid pitfalls while searching for professional help.

My pastor in 2005 was kind and extremely vigilant over my well-being.  He was young, and had limited experience with anyone who was suicidal. He would see me, but insisted I visit  a professional therapist as well.

He knew when to say “I cannot help,” and was humble enough to admit it. Contrary to what seems a popular opinion, therapy is not about having a person tell you what to do, or offer advice from the Bible. It is a patient occupation, or should be, and guides the client toward discovering answers for themselves. Specifically trained professionals are generally better-equipped to do this.  

Obviously, I’ve not met every therapist in the world. Nevertheless, the self-called Bible-based counselor I found this time remains the worst I’ve met in my world. “Bible-based” does not automatically mean wise. Proud and controlling people call themselves whatever they like.

At the beginning of our first session, immediately Connie* said I make all my decisions based on emotions, and she would fix that. She told me I am not attractive (hence my marriage troubles). Once I offered her a carefully written letter in hopes of discussing it. She pitched it onto her desk without looking at it, and turned back to face me. When I said I wanted her to read it, she indicated it was unimportant.

Once again, as previously described in these stories, I ignored my instincts. Ok, I thought. Give it time. 

Connie illegally gossiped. Through her (if she told the truth) I found out someone I know had an affair. On two occasions she pointed out specific clients I had seen in the waiting room, and complained about their issues.  

She tried to follow up with,  “So, what’s your problem today?”

Did this woman honestly expect me to open up to her after that?  “It’s the same stuff. Nothing new,” I said week after week. I was only there to meet my pastor’s requirement.  As ill as I was, stupidity was not a problem.

When he announced he was moving away, I did share that painful disappointment with Connie. She knew what date he would be saying goodbye. The week he left, Connie said she didn’t need to see me for another three weeks because in her opinion,  I was all better. She bragged, “Thanks to the work I’ve been doing with you.”

It was ridiculous. Free from any agreement, I canceled all future appointments and never looked back.

By the end of 2005, 18 months after reaching out (story 1), there had been little mental health care. I was alone again in my fight against despair. Medication continued, and after my experience with Connie, my psychiatrist agreed to see me more than 1/2 hour every few weeks. She was a gift.

Kind and talented mental health care providers who could be a great fit for you are out there. There are many more good ones than bad. Most are trying to the right thing by their clients. Here are some crucial points to consider before you trust someone with your fragile emotions. 

  • Does she have a good reputation? 
  • Is his chosen therapeutic approach highly rated?
  • Is she licensed? 
  • What experience does he have?  
  • Is she a specialist in your area of diagnosis or need? 

Ask questions pertinent to you.  Do you work better with people who tend to offer advice or who mostly listen?  Are you tolerant of disorganized offices? Are you one who needs lots of verbal encouragement, or is once in a while enough to keep you energized for weeks? Is the therapist prejudiced against race, gender, sexuality, age, religion, or size? It’s ok to ask this ahead of time. (“Are you able to work without judgement with…”)  Ask yourself too, if you prefer to work with a particular gender, age, etc.

Five years later, I desperately reached out once again for help. This time, results were very different.

There is MORE to this story. Stay tuned.

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NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline     1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help can be yours.

– picture from qualitystockphotos

*Names are changed

 

Where is Good Counsel to be Found? Story 3

Compassionate Love:Displaying compassion for those who struggle with mental illness  (c)2014 Nancy Virden

What I hope is coming of this series is how each of us matters- yes, you too- and we have the right and the power to get our needs met. Sometimes it seems difficult.  That does not mean we have to stop choosing what is best for our physical, mental, and spiritual health.

I was hospitalized twice in 2005, following unsuccessful attempts at finding professional mental health care (stories 1 and 2 of this series).  After my first short-lived stay, the psychiatrist who met me only for a few minutes told me I could go home and be happy. No meds, no follow-up.

Not having ever faced this facet of medical care before, I did not recognize the flaws in that approach. I blamed myself for not feeling better, and within a few weeks began a second hospitalization in a different medical center. 

This psychiatrist asked me why I was there. I told him some of how I felt.  He said clearly, although I will not quote him for privacy reasons, that my feelings were invalid. He went on to compare me to other patients saying, “there are people with real problems here.”   

He never heard my whole explanation. Seven days later, seeing me for only the second time, he said, “I’m going to ask you one more time. Why are you here?” 

I was afraid. He intimidated me, and my own anger scared me too. In a fragile state of mind, I did not answer his question. 

The man screamed. It was not only a yell; it was a loud temper tantrum. The intern standing next to him looked like she would go through the floor. He said I had better come up with a story other than had been shared with him the first night.  “Are you being abused? Did someone beat you? Is there something you are not telling me?”

Of course there was. Plenty. But I was not caring anymore whether he heard me. He was possibly more in need of psychiatric care than I was. 

One good came of meeting him; I was given medication for the first time. A behavioral health patient who is taking medication has to have an outside psychiatrist before leaving the hospital. The one I met was gentle and patient. She also apologized for her profession and told me I was not the first to complain about the hospital doctor.

Sadly, those who refer to psychiatrists as “quacks” are sometimes right. This gives anyone fuel for avoiding professional mental health care altogether. Maybe you are questioning the wisdom of finding a psychiatrist.

The “quack” accusation is most often not true. Finding help does not have to be this difficult. I was a newbie at it, and now know what to look for.

  • Licensure. (does he have it?)
  • Reputation (does anyone else recommend this person? Does she have any suspensions?) 
  • Personality (is this the kind of person you can trust and work with?)
  • Experience in the areas where you need help (how long has this person been in practice, and does he/she have a specialty?)

They are there!  They are there! And you are worth it!  

There is still MORE to this story, stay tuned.

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NOTE: I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences and observations of mental illness. In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline     1-800-273-TALK (8255). Hope and help can be yours.

*picture from qualitystockphotos

Compassionate Boundaries: Refer to the Experts (Eighth of Series)

Compassionate Love Blog: Displaying compassion for those who fight mental illness, addiction, and abuse (c)2013  Nancy Virden, Always the Fight Ministry 

24896256 young woman in a conversation with a consultant or psyc

Most of us are not mental or behavoral health specialists in a qualified position to diagnose. We may however, suggest to a hurting loved one or friend that they reach out to somebody who can help them more than we.

Earlier in this series, I said to avoid taking on a role that is not yours to fill. This boundary protects both the one you want to help, and you. 

Imagine walking into a small creek in search of a stone. It is an easy and fun challenge.  Let us upgrade the small creek to a small river.  This time you are to retrieve a certain type of stone. Ah, now it’s tougher. 

Finally, the river is a vast whirlpool. Water spins you up to your neck, and you must find a specific stone.  How long before you admit you are in too deep? 

Responding to hurting people by trying to meet their every need is dangerous.  For one thing,  we are not experts. Trained specialists know how to find what we cannot see. They have a better grasp on the human psyche, and the tools to try and meet specific needs. 

One simple statement has the potential to change a life.  “I’ll help you find good professional care.”  It is kind to say, “Others can help you better than I.”

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Other posts in this series: Friendship (1) ; God’s Example (2)Values and Family (3) ; Self-Care (4) ;  How to Say No (5) ; Motives Beware! (6)Refuse Blame (7) ;  How to Say Yes (9)

__________________

***** COMMENTS ALWAYS WELCOME

NOTE:  I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental and behavioral health challenges.  In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental or behavioral health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, in the U.S. call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or for a list of international suicide hotlines, go here

If you are suicidal with a plan, immediately call 911 in the U.S.  (for international emergency numbers, go here ), or go to your nearest emergency room. Do not be alone. Hope and help are yours.