Tag Archives: self-control

Moods are Moody

Compassionate Love: Displaying Compassion for Those Who Struggle with Mental Illness or Abuse  (c)2019 Nancy Virden, Always The Fight Ministries

man arranging his black necktie
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How many mood shifts do you observe in the following story?

You wake sensing all is well. With a stretch you begin singing the theme song of Snow White’s seven friends. “Hi ho, hi ho, it’s off to work we go…”

Today the new boss will arrive.  Assured you left early enough to make a good first impression, you calmly turn to the freeway’s entrance ramp only to suddenly slam the brakes! Traffic is at a standstill. With no escape, your mood sinks into frustration.

Your co-workers are exiting the morning meeting when you arrive. The new executive thanks each by name and gives you a quizzical look. Grateful at the chance to introduce yourself and explain your lateness, you step towards her, extending your hand.

Someone calls her name and she walks away. You begin to question your choice to get out of bed.

Hours later, your best suit is too hot. You felt successful this morning,  but by midday your mood is as soggy as your clothes. You have not yet met the new boss, and there is a paper jam.

Having maintained a professional demeanor and accomplished a significant amount of work despite the all-day battle against increasingly strong emotions, cleaning out the printer tips the scale. With a deep sigh, you mutter, “I hate this job!”

From behind a voice says, “You do not have to stay.”

Turning to see the same quizzical look on the boss’s face as this morning, your apologies begin.

So, how many mood changes do you see?

From content, eager, and happy feelings to frustration, disappointment, and anger, fear and hope end the workday. Keep in mind all the “little” emotions in-between such as the pride of a job well done, hurt over a co-worker’s comment, relief when the catered lunch is your favorite, and much more.

Moods had a moody day!

Good news is that moods are fluid. They change all the time. That means even the most difficult emotions will pass.

Whether you’ve held them in or worn them on your sleeve, moods are not constant. Give them time (and perhaps a good night’s sleep) before making decisions based on moody moods. Use your wise mind and accept that feelings come and go.

Today’s Helpful Word  

Proverbs 5:6,7

Trust in the Lord with all your heart,
And lean not on your own understanding;
 In all your ways acknowledge Him,
And He will direct your paths

**** COMMENTS ALWAYS WELCOME

NOTE:  I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental and behavioral health challenges.  In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental or behavioral health care.

If you are feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, in the U.S. call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or for a list of international suicide hotlines, go here.

If you are suicidal with a plan, immediately call 911 in the U.S. or go to your nearest emergency room. (for international emergency numbers, go here ). Hope and help are yours!

 

 

 

 

Is it Really Okay for a Christian to Say “No, I Cannot Help You”? (Part 2)

Compassionate Love: Displaying Compassion for Those Who Struggle with Mental Illness   (c)2019 Nancy Virden, Always The Fight Ministries

adult blur close up cold
Photo by Brigitte Tohm on Pexels.com

As Christians, we are often taught to give of oneself, to share, and to help where we can. “Love your neighbor” is a call many of us take seriously.

However, boundaries are wise. In the last post, this one and the next, I tell you why.

1. How can boundaries be loving? Boundaries are godly because they free us to love our neighbor . Have you helped until you were over your head? Were you tempted to shut yourself in and never again say yes to anyone? Contrary to what we often assume, love sets boundaries.

Individuals who actually make a difference in positive, meaningful, and effective ways, are careful not to make easy promises. By this they avoid failing to deliver on impulsively offered ones. When we learn healthy boundaries, we remain a steadfast friend, as supposed to walking away in frustration.

Jesus said, “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Even the Good Samaritan did not stick around to serve the beaten man hand and foot. After doing what he could, he went on to live his own life.

2. What about Christian duty?  Boundaries are godly because they prevent resentment and allow us to give with joy. In 2 Corinthians 9:7, Paul the Apostle is thanking the Corinthian church for offering a generous gift to struggling believers in Macedonia. He wrote, “Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.”

This concept is not only about money. We give of our time and energy best if we know when to say no.

3.  I say yes if a church leader needs me. That’s godly submission, right?  Boundaries are godly because saying no is often self-control. We said yes to certain responsibilities when we married, had children, accepted a job, or built up debt. It is God’s will for us to mind the promises we have made. Potential good deeds that stop us from obeying him in these matters must be rejected, however noble they are. This takes self-control. The result is freedom. In Proverbs 15:28 we read, “The heart of the righteous weighs its answers.”

Today’s Helpful Word  

Galatians 5: 22-23a, 25

“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. …Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit.”

 

***** COMMENTS ALWAYS WELCOME

NOTE:  I am not a doctor or mental health professional. I speak only from personal experiences with and observations of mental and behavioral health challenges.  In no way is this website intended to substitute for professional mental or behavioral health care.

If you are struggling emotionally today or feeling suicidal, or concerned about someone who is, in the U.S. call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or for a list of international suicide hotlines, go here.

If you are suicidal with a plan, immediately call 911 in the U.S.  (for international emergency numbers, go here ), or go to your nearest emergency room. Do not be alone. Hope and help are yours.